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MAN-SYSTEMS INTEGRATION STANDARDS VOLUME 1 VOLUME 2 SEARCH CONTACT US

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MAN-SYSTEMS INTEGRATION STANDARDS
FOREWORD
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UNITS OF MEASURE AND CONVERSION FACTORS
ACCELERATION
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Regime Applicability:
  •  Section 1
  •  Section 2
  •  Section 3
  •  Section 4
  •  Section 5
  •  Section 6
  •  Section 7
  •  Section 8
  •  Section 9
  •  Section 10
  •  Section 11
  •  Section 12
  •  Section 13
  •  Section 14
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Appendix G - Acceleration Regime Applicability

USER'S GUIDE

Most sections of Volume I contain design considerations that are applicable to space and planetary missions. While some standards may only be relevant to microgravity operations (i.e., orbital operations), another standard may be applied to launch and entry conditions where extreme forces of gravity are imposed.

The code shown in brackets { } at the beginning of each section indicates which environment, or acceleration regime, is applicable to the section. Definitions of the codes are provided below:

{O} = Orbital: The microgravity acceleration environments encountered in orbital and very low acceleration transorbital operations.

{L} = Launch/Entry: The multi-G launch, entry, and abort acceleration environments.

{P} = Planetary: The G-loads encountered on the moon and Mars. Long-term, low-level accelerations encountered in some transorbital flight operations may be applicable. An artificial gravity system may also fall into this acceleration regime.

{A} This regime includes all of the above along with one-G acceleration environment.

(blank) None of the above apply.

The requirements in this document will be applied to equipment that is intended for different mission phases.For instance, a space shuttle handrail must withstand the pressures of launch acceleration whilst an object which is installed on-orbit would not. Thus, we have made an effort to identify which of these requirements must withstand launch accelerations, among others, and this data is presented here. You may investigate the applicable acceleration regime for specific requirements by looking in the appropriate sections below.

Acceleration Regime ListSkip Section listing

2     Regime for Introduction

2     Regime for General Requirements

3     Regime for Anthropometry and Biomechanics Requirements

4     Regime for Human Performance Capability Requirements  

5     Regime for Natural and Induced Environment Requirements

6     Regime for Crew Safety Requirements

7     Regime for Health Management Requirements

8     Regime for Architecture Requirements

9     Regime for Workstation Requirements

10   Regime for Activity Center Requirements

11   Regime for Hardware and Equipment Requirements

12   Regime for Design for Maintainability Requirements

13   Regime for Facility Management Requirements

14   Regime for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Requirements

This appendix can also be used to identify all requirements that are applicable to these specific acceleration regimes: Orbital accelerations only, Planetary accelerations only, Launch and Re-entry accelerations only, and all of the acceleration regimes.

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